Gear Up/ Upward Bound Faq's | MVCC | Mohawk Valley Community College
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GEAR UP/Upward Bound FAQ's

What Is Upward Bound?

Upward Bound is a federally funded educational opportunity outreach program that promotes and supports students from underrepresented populations. 

Upward Bound works with Proctor H.S. students through a campus based program which provides tutoring/instruction in literature, composition, mathematics, science, and foreign language during the academic year and summer months. 

Two thirds of Upward Bound’s students must be low-income and first generation in their family to potentially receive a Bachelor’s Degree, with the remaining third being either low-income or first generation student.

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Who is eligible for Upward Bound?

Applicants’ parents may not have a four year college degree prior to applying for the program, family taxable income for the preceding year must meet Federal low-income guidelines,  applicant should have a minimum of a 2.5 GPA, and be in grades 9-11 at Proctor H.S. in Utica, New York.

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Upward Bound: How Does A Student Apply?

Student can request an application from the Upward Bound Office (MVCC Academic Bldg., room 128) or his/hers guidance counselor.  Student must fill out application completely and get a referral from a teacher or guidance counselor.

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What Does Upward Bound Offer Students?

Upward Bound offers:  tutoring, mentoring, and counseling; college visitations; assistance with college scholarships and FAFSA forms, preparing for college entrance exams; exposure to cultural events, and financial literacy instruction.

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How and why is MVCC Math Corps funded in Utica, New York?

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded a nearly $3 million grant to Math Corps, a partnership that includes Mohawk Valley Community College, Wayne State University in Detroit, Cleveland State University, and a not-for-profit organization in Philadelphia. Math Corps is designed to enhance mentorship, enthusiasm for, and understanding of mathematics concepts.

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Where did MVCC Math Corps get its roots?

Math Corps was originally developed over two decades ago by a team at Wayne State University, with the goal of creating a combined academic enrichment and mentoring program that could bring middle and high school students from urban centers together with college students to learn mathematics from each other, as well as to interact with professional mathematicians in a university setting.

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Who do I contact if I am interested in MVCC’s math Corps program?

To learn more about MVCC Math Corps, contact program representatives at 315-792-5828.

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Who does the program serve?

MVCC Math Corps serves 40 7th graders, 40 8th graders, and 40 UCSD high school students in a four-week intensive summer camp that includes classroom instruction and fun project-based learning activities. The camp runs Mondays – Thursdays from July – August.  The program seeks to create a self-perpetuating corps of students from middle school through college, who excel academically, hold personal values that breed success in general, and who, through strong mentoring relationships, pass their knowledge and their values on to younger students. As they grow, those younger students do the same.

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Who in the community supports NSF funding for MVCC Math Corps?

The MVCC chapter of this program is supported in Utica by generous donations from the Mele Family Fund and the M&T Bank/Partner’s Trust Bank Charitable Fund, and Indium Corporation
The purpose of this NSF grant is to develop better analysis methods to identify the nature, extent, and reasons for Math Corps’ success with youth learner in urban setting. The goal of MVCC Math Corps is very basic. “This program is designed to help kids develop a love for learning, and to do that in a learning-community family atmosphere,” said Todd Kubica, director of MVCC Math Corps.
The program seeks to create a self-perpetuating corps of students from middle school through college, who excel academically, hold personal values that breed success in general, and who, through strong mentoring relationships, pass their knowledge and their values on to younger students. As they grow, those younger students do the same.

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