Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update // April 22, 2020

Because the College transitioned the academic and support services to alternative delivery, refunds will not be provided. Any student who has chosen to withdraw and feels that they have a legitimate reason for doing so may request a tuition appeal through the normal procedures outlined here.

The College moved from a largely in-class environment to almost 100% alternative delivery in one week’s time. Even prior to the additional technology and student support costs necessary due to COVID-19 purchases, the total income generated by the fees did not cover the total cost of expenditures. No refunds will be issued.

The College is continuing to provide programming in an alternative format. No refunds will be issued. Please refer to the Program Board social media accounts and the Hawks Life app for the daily and weekly programs and activities that are available.

Any combination of eight events and tutorials will be counted (Up to 8 online tutorials will count for graduation this semester.)

This is the migration of classroom and face-to-face instruction to some form of asynchronous or synchronous distance learning method. This can be online or other forms such as videoconference, YouTube, or other technology-supported formats.

All of the College’s programs of study and classes have been transitioned to online with the exception of welding, carpentry, and machining. Those classes have been rescheduled. All impacted students have been contacted and made aware of the changes.

The College is gathering and designing instructional videos, webinars, and web links that can be used to help students become familiar with the new platforms. There is an orientation site in the Blackboard learning management system that trains students how to use the platform. 

The College has a fully staffed support team available to answer questions students may have. Please contact the Educational Technologies Office at 315-792-5398 or 315-792-5551 or online at https://mvcc.edu/edtech.

No, the Libraries on both campuses are closed, but the librarians still want to help, and can can assist you remotely in many ways with research needs, access to resources, and citation creation. You can reach the librarians in many ways, including:

Both physical bookstore locations in Utica and Rome are closed. But our campus store is offering the following options to supplement and support you during this time. Please check the campus store website for continued updates: https://mvcc.bncollege.com.

  1. Free Online Shipping: Free shipping on all items with no minimum purchase. This includes various formats of course materials, supplies, apparel, technology, and more.
  2. Access to eBooks at no additional charge: Visit the campus store website to gain access to eBooks at no additional charge with your .edu email address. You can access up to seven eBooks for the designated period free of charge.
  3. Free Access to Lumen Learning OER Courseware: Lumen Learning, our OER partner, is offering free access to courseware to help supplement content.
  4. Free Shipping on Rental, Returns & Deadline Extensions: The campus store is offering free shipping return labels and is extending the non-return period without penalty to assist with increased returns by mail. Click the COVID-19 message on the homepage of the campus store website.

Contact your primary healthcare provider or the MVCC Health and Wellness Center on the Utica Campus at 315-792-5452 to complete the screening process protocol.

The Residence Halls will not re-open as originally planned on March 22nd. Students with a housing or food insecurity can contact Dean Gibbons in the Residence Life Office by calling 315-792-5657. Requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

The College will schedule residence hall students for specific windows of time and day to come to campus and remove their belongings. We anticipate these times will be communicated to your student email by the morning of Friday, March 20. Please do not arrive on campus without a scheduled time.

The Residence Halls provide many of our students with their housing and food security and they have paid to live here. While some students may have readily available alternatives during times when the Residence Halls are closed, others depend upon on-campus housing and all of the related services that are integral in academic success. 

Communications will be sent primarily through student and employee email. NY-Alert will be used for urgent communications and updates. A webpage with all critical communications and resources will be updated regularly at MVCC.edu/Covid19. Most communications will be shared on all College social media accounts as well.

Students should also check their email for the MVCC Student Tomorrow emails, which will provide a consolidated place to find out what is happening at the College.  

Classes will continue using the established alternative delivery methods. 

All first disbursements of Financial Aid refund checks have been mailed. The second disbursement will go out on April 9th. No checks will be distributed in person.

Classes will resume on March 23rd with most classes being transitioned to some form of distance learning or alternative delivery to promote social distancing and reduce population density on campus. All of the College’s programs of study have been transitioned to online with the exception of welding, carpentry, and machining. Those classes have been rescheduled, and all impacted students have been contacted to be made aware of the changes. 

We have every intention of maintaining the existing academic calendar for the spring semester with few exceptions, so we are not planning on extending it at this time.

While the College is not closing, it is limiting the in-person availability of academic supports and offices effective 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 20, 2020.

Support services, such as Advisement, Counseling, Accessibility Resources, Financial Aid, and Career Services, Registrar, and Veterans Services, are being delivered alternatively to the best of our ability. Students who have special circumstances can contact the appropriate support office via email or phone. Any student who has concerns outside of the classroom should reach out to your Student Support Advisor. You can email them directly, or you can contact the Advisement Office by calling 315-731-5710, by emailing advisement@mvcc.edu, or by using the live chat.

If you don't know your advisor's name, that information is available in Degree Works and on the Student Holistic Support webpage.  

Based on current recommendations from global public health organizations, orders from the state government, and to protect the health of our community, we are moving this year’s Spring Commencement ceremony, originally scheduled for Friday, May 8, at the Adirondack Bank Center-Utica Aud, to a virtual celebration that will be broadcast online on Friday, May 29, 2020, featuring formal remarks and sharable presentations honoring each graduate. While this will not be the same as our traditional ceremony, we are committed to finding the best way possible to recognize our graduates, and will strive to make it meaningful, memorable, and sharable. We also recognize and share the interest of students who wish to commemorate in a more traditional way, and are providing the opportunity to invite all members of the Class of 2020 to participate in our December Commencement ceremony, if public health guidelines allow at that time. Click here for more information.

All of the College’s programs of study and classes have transitioned to online with the exception of welding, carpentry, and machining, which are scheduled to recommence later this spring (all impacted students have been notified to be made aware of the changes). Regarding non-credit community education classes, the College will communicate directly with students enrolled in those classes as to the status of specific classes.

All food service is now to-go. The dining hall is still open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. for to-go meals only, just for students and employees on campus. To-go containers will be distributed at the register, and entire meals will be taken to go. The dining hall is not available for dine-in service at this point.

For students who only have cellular service, it is recommended that you contact your instructor. Spectrum is offering free internet access for 60 days for students who do not already have an account. More information is available here: https://www.syracuse.com/coronavirus/2020/03/coronavirus-spectrum-to-offer-free-high-speed-internet-to-households-with-students.html, or people can call Spectrum at 1-844-488-8395.

If a confirmed case has been identified on campus, the College will communicate the event and any necessary action steps and follow up, but will not release any individual information to the public.

We are working with our ADA compliance team to ensure that all courses being migrated to an alternative delivery method are in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. We encourage all students with disabilities to self-disclose to the Office of Accessibility Resources at 315-792-5644.


Contact your primary healthcare provider or the MVCC Health and Wellness Center on the Utica Campus at 315-792-5452 to complete the screening process protocol.

Any employee coming to any of the MVCC locations is required to wear a face covering, according to Executive Order 202.16: 

“Face coverings include, but are not limited to, cloth (e.g. homemade sewn, quick cut, bandana), surgical masks, N-95 respirators, and face shields.”

If you do not have a face covering, the College will provide one for you. If you are working on campus regularly, your supervisor will contact you with additional information. While you may not expect to interact with the public or a “customer” while making your visit, there is always a chance you may encounter someone unexpectedly due to the open access to the campuses. It is expected that all employees will have a face covering with them that can be used in such an instance. 

The Facilities & Operations Team has designed door hangers to help keep track of workspaces that have been disinfected and those that need to be disinfected. If you come to campus and enter your workspace, please call one of the Facilities staff at one of the numbers on the door hanger, and then turn the hanger around so the red side is out. They will then come and disinfect the area after you leave. If you are working regularly on campus, Facilities will know that and disinfect on a daily basis. 

This and all other technology-related information can be found at mvcc.edu/information-technology/student-kickstart-guide.pdf

Based on current recommendations from global public health organizations, orders from the state government, and to protect the health of our community, we are moving this year’s Spring Commencement ceremony, originally scheduled for Friday, May 8, at the Adirondack Bank Center-Utica Aud, to a virtual celebration that will be broadcast online on Friday, May 29, 2020, featuring formal remarks and sharable presentations honoring each graduate. While this will not be the same as our traditional ceremony, we are committed to finding the best way possible to recognize our graduates, and will strive to make it meaningful, memorable, and sharable. We also recognize and share the interest of students who wish to commemorate in a more traditional way, and are providing the opportunity to invite all members of the Class of 2020 to participate in our December Commencement ceremony, if public health guidelines allow at that time. Click here for more information.

Employees are encouraged to use alternative formats (teleconferencing platforms, etc.) for meetings.

All food service is now to-go. The dining hall is still open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. for to-go meals only, just for students and employees on campus. To-go containers will be distributed at the register, and entire meals will be taken to go. The dining hall is not available for dine-in service at this point.

If a confirmed case has been identified on campus, the College will communicate the event and any necessary action steps and follow-up, but will not release any individual information to the public.

Generally, yes. A parent or eligible student must provide written consent before an educational agency or institution discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from a student’s education records, unless one of the exceptions to FERPA’s general consent rule applies. FERPA requires that a consent form be signed and dated by a parent or eligible student and (1) specify the records that may be disclosed; (2) state the purpose of the disclosure; and (3) identify the party or class of parties to whom the disclosure may be made. 

Although educational institutions can often address threats to the health or safety of students or other individuals in a manner that does not identify a particular student. FERPA permits educational institutions to disclose, without prior written consent PII from student education records to appropriate parties in connection with an emergency, if knowledge of that information is necessary to protect the health or safety of other individuals. This “health or safety emergency” exception to FERPA’s general consent requirement is limited in time to the period of the emergency and generally does not allow for a blanket release of PII from student education records. Typically, law enforcement officials, public health officials, trained medical personnel, and parents (including parents of an eligible student) are the types of appropriate parties to whom PII from education records may be disclosed under this FERPA exception.

For purposes of FERPA’s health or safety emergency exception, the determination by an educational institution that there is a specific emergency is not based on a generalized or distant threat of a possible or eventual emergency for which the likelihood of occurrence is unknown, such as would be addressed in general emergency preparedness activities. If local public health authorities determine that a public health emergency, such as COVID-19, is a significant threat to students or other individuals in the community, an educational agency or institution in that community may determine that an emergency exists as well.

Under the FERPA health or safety emergency exception, an educational institution is responsible for making a determination, on a case-by-case basis, whether to disclose PII from education records, and it may take into account the totality of the circumstances pertaining to the threat. If the institution determines that there is an articulable and significant threat to the health or safety of the student or another individual and that certain parties need the PII from education records, to protect the health or safety of the student or another individual, it may disclose that information to such parties without consent. This is a flexible standard under which the Department will not substitute its judgment for that of the educational institution so that the institution may bring appropriate resources to bear on the situation, provided that, based on the information available at the time of the institution’s determination, there is a rational basis for such determination. We note also that, within a reasonable period of time after a disclosure is made under this exception, an educational institution must record in the student’s education records the articulable and significant threat that formed the basis for the disclosure and the parties to whom information was disclosed. 

Yes. If an educational institution, taking into account the totality of the circumstances, determines that an articulable and significant threat exists to the health or safety of a student in attendance at the institution (or another individual at the institution) as a result of the virus that causes COVID-19, it may disclose, without prior written consent, PII from student education records to appropriate officials at a public health department who need the information to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. Public health department officials may be considered “appropriate parties” by an educational institution under FERPA’s health or safety emergency exception, even in the absence of a formally declared health emergency. Typically, public health officials and trained medical personnel are among the types of appropriate parties to whom PII from education records may be non-consensually disclosed under FERPA’s health or safety emergency exception.

It depends, but generally yes, only if that information is in a non-personally identifiable form. Specifically, the the educational institution must make a reasonable determination that a student’s identity is not personally identifiable, whether through single or multiple releases, and taking into account other reasonably available information. If an educational institution discloses information about students in non-personally identifiable form, consent by the parents or eligible students is not needed under FERPA. For example, if an educational institution releases the fact that individuals are absent due to COVID-19 (but does not disclose their identities), this would generally not be considered personally identifiable to the absent students under FERPA as long as there are other individuals at the institution who are absent for other reasons. However, we caution educational institutions to ensure that in releasing such facts, they do so in a manner that does not disclose other information that, alone or in combination, would allow a reasonable person in the school community to identify the students who are absent due to COVID-19 with reasonable certainty.

FERPA permits educational institutions to non-consensually disclose PII from education records in the form of contact information of absent students to the public health department in specific circumstances, such as in connection with a health or safety emergency or pursuant to other applicable exceptions.

While FERPA generally permits the nonconsensual disclosure of properly designated “directory information” (e.g., name, address, phone number, grade level) when parents or eligible students have not opted out of such a disclosure, it does not permit an educational institution to disclose “directory information” on students that is linked to non-directory information (such as information regarding a student’s illness). For instance, an educational institution may not disclose directory information on all students who are receiving special education services or those who have been absent from school.

Therefore, unless a specific FERPA exception applies, educational institutions should prepare consent forms for parents and eligible students to sign to allow the potential sharing of this type of information if they create, or intend to create, a tracking or monitoring system to identify an outbreak before an emergency is recognized.

No. FERPA only permits nonconsensual disclosures of PII from students’ education records under the health or safety emergency exception to “appropriate parties” (such as public health officials) whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of students or other individuals. While the media may have a role in alerting the community of an outbreak, they are not “appropriate parties” under FERPA’s health or safety emergency exception because they generally do not have a role in protecting individual students or others at the educational institution. “Appropriate parties” in this context are normally parties who provide specific medical or safety attention, such as public health and law enforcement officials.

In most cases, it is sufficient to report the fact that an individual in the school has been determined to have COVID-19, rather than specifically identifying the student who is infected. School notification is an effective method of informing parents and eligible students of an illness in the school. For settings in which parents are primarily doing drop-offs and pick-ups, posting signs on the doors may be effective. In other settings, sending home or emailing a notification may also be effective. These methods serve to notify parents and eligible students of a potential risk, which may be particularly important for students who may be more susceptible to infection or to developing severe complications from an infection, and to alert parents to look for symptoms in their own children and eligible students to more closely monitor themselves for symptoms.

Nothing in FERPA prevents schools from telling parents and students that a specific teacher or other school official has COVID-19 because FERPA applies to students’ education records, not records on school officials. However, there may be State laws that apply in these situations.

There may be a rare situation during a health or safety emergency, however, in which schools may determine (in conjunction with health, law enforcement, or other such officials) that parents of students or eligible students are appropriate parties to whom to disclose identifiable information about a student with COVID-19. For example, school officials may determine that it is appropriate to disclose identifiable information about of a student with COVID-19 to parents of other students if parents need to know this information to take appropriate action to protect the health or safety of their children. For example if a student with COVID-19 is a wrestler and has been in direct and close contact with other students who are on the team or who are in the school and have higher health risks, school officials may determine it necessary to disclose the identity of the diagnosed student to the parents of the other students. In these limited situations, parents and eligible students may need to be aware of this information in order to take appropriate precautions or other actions to ensure the health or safety of their child or themselves, especially if their child or they may have a higher risk of susceptibility to COVID-19 or of developing severe complications from COVID-19.

School officials should make the determination on a case-by-case basis whether a disclosure of the student’s name is absolutely necessary to protect the health or safety of students or other individuals or whether a general notice is sufficient, taking into account the totality of the circumstances, including the needs of such students or other individuals to have such information in order to take appropriate protective action(s) and the risks presented to the health or safety of such students or other individuals.

Yes, for dependent students and generally yes, but see below. Under FERPA, an educational institution, including an institution of postsecondary education, may disclose, without the eligible student’s written consent, PII from an eligible student’s education records to his or her parents under certain conditions. For example, a university physician treating an eligible student for COVID-19 might determine that the student’s treatment records should be disclosed to the student’s parents. This disclosure may be made, without consent of the eligible student, if the parents claim the eligible student as a dependent under section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. If the parents do not claim the eligible student as a dependent, then the disclosure may be made to the parents, without the eligible student’s written consent, if the disclosure is in connection with a health or safety emergency provided certain conditions are satisfied. 

FERPA permits educational institutions to release information from education records without consent after the removal of all PII, provided that the agency or institution has made a reasonable determination that a student’s identity is not personally identifiable, whether through single or multiple releases, and taking into account other reasonably available information. Thus, it would be problematic to disclose that every student in a particular class or grade level is absent if there is, for instance, a directory with the names of every student in that class or grade. Therefore, it is prudent that educational institutions obtain written consent to permit the disclosure of PII from students’ education records to the public health department. If the parent or eligible student will not provide written consent for the disclosure of the PII, then the educational institution may not make the disclosure unless it has determined that there is an applicable exception to the general requirement of consent that permits the disclosure, such as if a health or safety emergency exists and the PII is disclosed to an appropriate party whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals.

Yes. FERPA generally requires educational institutions to maintain a record of each request for access to and each disclosure of PII from the education records of each student. Moreover, when making a disclosure under the health or safety emergency provision in FERPA, educational institutions are specifically required to record the articulable and significant threat to the health or safety of a student or other individual that formed the basis for the disclosure and the parties to whom the institution disclosed the information. The record of each request for access to and each disclosure of PII from student education records must be maintained with the education records of each student as long as the records are maintained. This requirement enables parents and eligible students who do not provide written consent for disclosure of education records to see the circumstances under which and the parties to whom their information was disclosed. However, educational institutions are not required to record disclosures for which the parent or eligible student has provided written consent.

For any questions about Paid Sick Leave and Expanded Family and Medical Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, please visit New York Paid Family Leave COVID-19: Frequently Asked Questions

For the overview, please check out Employee Rights Families First Response Act Poster.


The Residence Halls will not re-open as originally planned on March 22nd and will remain closed for the Spring semester. Students with a housing or food insecurity can contact Dean Gibbons in the Residence Life Office by emailing reshalls@mvcc.edu. Requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. 

Yes, you can continue your classes, similar to the commuting students, with alternative delivery methods.

All food service is now to-go. The dining hall is still open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. for to-go meals only, just for students and employees on campus. To-go containers will be distributed at the register, and entire meals will be taken to go. The dining hall is not available for dine-in service at this point.

Yes, your housing is reserved. The Room Selection Process will continue. Please watch your student email carefully over the next weeks regarding information regarding actual room selection. We will also assist you with scheduling your Fall classes.

In an effort to comply with social distancing obligations, the College will schedule residence halls students for specific windows of time and day to come to campus and remove their belongings. We anticipate these times will be communicated to your student email by the morning of Friday, March 20. Please do not arrive on campus without a scheduled time.

Yes, there are R.A. positions available for next year. We invite you to apply at: https://mvcc.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?site=3&id=699

The College is in discussion now about what the pro-rated refund/credit will be and will communicate this to all affected students as soon as possible.

The College is continuing to provide programming in an alternative format. No refunds will be issued. Please refer to the Program Board social media accounts and the Hawks Life app for the daily and weekly programs and activities that are available.


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update // March 12, 2020 

MVCC President VanWagonerIn an effort to provide the most current information and additional context for our decision-making regarding measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, I want to update you about how we are responding to the changing situation.

First, I would like to thank each of you for your patience and understanding during this time. The rapidly evolving situation has understandably caused considerable concern and many of you have raised good questions and suggestions about how to proceed. I hope that this email will offer some clarity into the situation and the actions the College is taking.

We continue to be guided by relevant federal, state, and local agencies and remain in direct communication with the Oneida County Department of Health – As of today, there have not been any reported cases in Oneida County. Our Crisis team, composed of trained subject-matter experts from across campus is meeting daily to reassess the risk posed to the community and will continue to monitor the situation. We are also in daily communication with SUNY System and are receiving guidance and instruction from the Governor’s office.

With regard to the question of closure, per current guidance, we continue to plan on closing only if a case of the virus has been confirmed on-campus. In the meantime, we have taken several steps and will continue to promote social distancing – the practice of minimizing large gatherings and encouraging distancing of six feet or more for extended periods of time.

As you may be aware, the spread of this virus has prompted many colleges to look for alternative methods for instruction and operations. As we wait for additional guidance on various issues, here is the list of measures we will take beginning Monday, March 16.

  • Spring break will be extended by one week for students. Classes will resume on March 23 with most in some form of distance learning or alternative delivery methods.
  • All credit classes will be suspended next week to allow faculty and support staff to prepare for potential alternative delivery methods for class instruction and support services. This also will allow administration to prepare contingency plans to reduce the population density of all College locations or in the event the College is required to close. Academic VP Kahler will be sending a communication shortly to all full-time faculty regarding attendance and expectations for the extended spring break. Another communication will then follow to all adjunct faculty. 
  • The transition to distance learning may include a variety of strategies such as online (Blackboard), remote video and phone conferencing (Zoom or other service), and other alternative methods of delivery for classes. More information will be communicated next week. Students involved in clinical experiences will be contacted by the respective department with guidance.
  • Additional information and guidance will be provided to faculty and students by VP of Academic Affairs Kahler and VP of Student Affairs Reynolds as updates become available. 
  • Our custodial staff will continue enhanced campus-wide cleaning and sanitizing throughout the next week. 
  • Residence hall students may return to and remain on campus, if they choose, beginning March 22 at noon. Students with any special circumstances, or housing or food insecurities, who may need to return earlier should contact the Residence Life office after noon tomorrow for guidance.
  • All student services will continue to remain open, including but not limited to: residence halls, dining services, library, learning commons, health services, C3, and computer labs.
  • All College-sponsored travel will continue to be approved by Cabinet on a case-by-case basis.
  • All campus events and meetings with over 50 people will need to be approved by Cabinet on a case-by-case basis.
  • The previously scheduled disbursement of financial aid overage (refund) checks will be mailed to students’ current address. Students are encouraged to sign into their SIRS accounts to verify and confirm the current address is on file. No checks will be distributed in person.

We acknowledge that this course of action will disrupt routines and can cause anxiety, but are necessary given the circumstances. In the event of an emergency, we will use all communications platforms includiNYAlertert, email, website, and all social media tools.

I thank you for your understanding and cooperation and we will continue to send regular updates as we receive further information.  My next communication will be no later than 5 p.m. tomorrow.

President's SignatureRandall J. VanWagoner, Ph.D.
President
Mohawk Valley Community College

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update // March 11, 2020

 
MVCC President VanWagonerDear members of the MVCC community,
 
Senior and emergency management leadership at MVCC has been actively engaged in monitoring developments and updating our plans with the goal to protect the health and safety of all students, faculty, staff, and community members - our top priority. While the situation continues to escalate and intensify, I want to provide you with an update.
 
Although there is no evidence to suggest that any MVCC location is currently at an increased risk, this is a rapidly evolving situation and the College urges everyone to stay updated. As the number of state and nationwide cases increases, local context remains critical to keep in mind. 
 

What has been done thus far at MVCC?

  • An hochoc workgroup has been meeting regularly for the past month to monitor this ever-evolving situation. The group has and will continue to meet and attend relevawebinarsars, which have helped the proactive development of a series of questions that has been guiding our planning efforts to this point.
  • Our Health Center coordinator is a member of the Oneida County task force on this issue that is providing regular updated communications.
  • We have identified quarantine procedures should one or more students test positive for the virus, which consist of either self-quarantine at home under the guidance of the Oneida County Health Department or staying in designated quarantine rooms in our residence halls.
  • Facilities has increased cleaning of door knobs and other surfaces that are frequently touched by individuals.
  • We have purchased additional cleaning materials, disinfectant wipes, disinfectant spray, refills for the hand sanitizer stations, personal protective equipment, and N-95 masks for employees who need to go into areas potentially infected with the virus.
  • The MVCC Health Center has established screening protocols and has been sending regular reminder communications to employees and students based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, SUNY, and the Oneida County Health Department.
  • In order to stress the importance of precautionary and preventative measures, we have created COVID-19 informational posters and placed them across campus. 
  • My Cabinet leadership team members have been receiving regular communications from SUNY on potential implications, ranging from study abroad and curriculum, to enrollment and financial aid.

What about closing the college?

It is important to remain calm and evaluate the changing context of the situation. At this time, we will not close the College, cancel classes, or move classes online pemptivelyely. Unless we identify a confirmed case on-campus, we do not need to take such disruptive action that has very real consequences for students and employees. Things may very well change, but at this point, here is what we know and are planning to do.
 
  • In light of the changing daily context of the virus, my Cabinet leadership team will be inventorying all college-related travel through the end of the semester to evaluate planned trips on a case-by-case basis.
  • Our crisis team is drawing on its experiences executing our protocols with recent incidents and has met multiple times to assess the evolving circumstances and continue preparations for various crisis scenarios.
  • Vice President Kahler will be issuing guidance to employees regarding academic matters.
  • I will continue to participate on a daily SUNY Presidents conference call.
  • Upon the report of a confirmed on-campus case of a student, employee, or community member who has visited campus, we will close the College in order to perform deep cleaning of surfaces. The length of time will be dependent upon many factors and be guided by and coordinated with Oneida County and State Health authorities.
Things are rapidly developing each day and the College will continue to remain in close contact with the Oneida County Department of Health and other Health and Government officials for updates and assistance. We will provide updates via email and at mveduedu/covid19 as more information becomes available. 
 
We ask that employees and students experiencing fever, difficulty breathing, persistent cough, or other symptoms potentially related to respiratory illness refrain from coming to campus until their symptoms have resolved or they’ve been cleared by their doctor or health professional. Any questions regarding use, availability, and documentation of leave time that employees may have should be directed to the Office of Human Resources. 
 
Students with questions or concerns may contact the Student Health Center, located in Alumni College Center on the Utica Campus, Room 104 at 315-792-5452.
 
For more information, please visit the following resources:
Thanks in advance for your cooperation, diligence, and understanding.
President's SignatureRandall J. VanWagoner, Ph.D.
President
Mohawk Valley Community College

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Info // February 15, 2020

Recently, a new coronavirus - 2019 Novel (New) Coronavirus - was detected in WuhaHubeibei Province, China, that has not been previously found in humans. This coronavirus can lead to fever, cough, and shortness of breath. There are hundreds of confirmed cases in China, including cases outside of Wuhan and additional cases being identified in a growing number of countries internationally, including the United States.  

MVCC is watching the outbreak closely and is working with the Oneida County Health Department and the College Physician. Please be reassured that there is no need for alarm or to change daily routines in any way. There are no confirmed cases in Oneida County. All MVCC students and staff are advised to follow the same precautions they normally would during cold and flu season. Please see the recommendations below:

  • If you're not already vaccinated, get your flu shot.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when sneezing or coughing.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often; use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Stay home if you have a fever or are feeling sick.

This is an ever-evolving situation and MVCC will keep abreast with any changes throughout the course of this illness. Please visit the Center for Disease Control's website for the situation summary which offers the most up-to-date information on this virus.

Recently, a novel (new) coronavirus was detected in thousands of people worldwide, primarily in China. A "novel coronavirus" is a strain that has not been previously found in humans. This novel coronavirus can lead to fever, cough, and shortness of breath.
If you are made aware of a student/person of concern, please refer them their Primary Healthcare Provider. It is recommended they remain in a private space or residence and call to inquire about their next steps to limit possible exposure with anyone else.
Wash your hands often for at least 20 seconds with soap and water. If there is not an opportunity to wash your hands, use alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Avoid close contact with any sick or infected individuals. Avoid large crowds and crowded functions. If you feel symptomatic within 14 days, stay at home and call your Primary Healthcare Provider for assistance.

As with any other major issue, MVCC has a crisis team in place to review and monitor evolving situations and make recommendations as needed.

Since this virus is very new, health authorities continue to carefully watch how this virus spreads. It is known to spread from animals to humans, and it also may be spread from person-to-person. It’s not clear yet how easily Novel (New) Coronavirus spreads from person-to-person. It’s important to know this in order to better understand the risk associated with this virus. 


Important Health Information for Those Who Have Recently Traveled to China, Iran, South Korea, Italy, or Japan

If you are a student, contact the campus Health and Wellness Center for advice. Please call before coming to the Center. The number is 315-792-5452.

If you are a non-student, contact your Primary Healthcare Provider. Please call in advance of showing up.

If you recently traveled and feel sick with fever, cough, or have trouble breathing, or you develop symptoms, you should:

  • Seek medical care right away. Call ahead and tell them about your travel and symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Stay home if you’re ill and isolate yourself from roommates, except for seeking medical care.
  • Avoid further travel until the illness resolves.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. If unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Prevention

There are currently no vaccines available to protect against human coronavirus infection. To reduce your risk of infection:

Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.

Symptoms

Humcoronavirusesses commonly cause mild-to-moderate illness in people. Symptoms can include:

  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Cough
  • Fever

Treatment

There is no specific treatment available for any coronavirus. People infected with coronavirus should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms.

Additional Resources